A Miss Marple Mystery (Miss Marple Mysteries) - The Body in the Library

By Agatha Christie

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Readers` Reviews

★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
s dalsgaard
Couldn't even finish it. The story line takes forever to develop. And I thought it was extremely boring. But, that's just me. I've never been a fan of Agatha Christie and found most of the stories rather boring. Too much conversation and not enough action.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
jason chance
Agatha Christie never disappoints, excellent mystery, reading as fast as I can to reach the amswer! ❤ Treat yourself to this Miss Marple puzzler, I read it in one sitting! Next: And Then There Were None!
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
bhavyatta bhardwaj
Although the story line is interesting enough, the writing style is somewhat ho-hum. It certainly doesn't grab you at the first sentence and make you want to continue reading. I haven't finished the book and so don't know how unique the solution to the crime is, but I'm not expecting anything mind blowing.
Sparkling Cyanide :: The Agatha Christie Book Club :: The Murder at the Vicarage (Miss Marple Mysteries) :: Autobiography, An :: Buckle My Shoe (Hercule Poirot Mysteries)
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
ashley langford
I have to admit this was my first Agatha Christie book ever. I was quite surprised that Miss Marple didn't have much of a role in the book. It reminded me why I don't generally like historical mysteries. I enjoyed the book but I probably won't read Agatha Christie again.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
maggie brooke
Dolly Bantry was slowly waking to the usual sounds of her well run household. Her peaceful, predictable life was thoroughly disrupted when her maid entered, bringing not the expected morning tea, but news of a body in the library! Not only a body, but a young woman! Platinum blonde no less! When her husband could supply no explanation for this occurance Dolly did the only sensible thing - she called her friend and neighbor, Jane Marple.
Miss Marple set about her inquiries and, aided by the police, began to sort out the mess. The trail led to the film industry and then to the nearby seaside resort of Danemouth where the wealthy guests and the staff of the Majestic Hotel become embroiled in the mystery. Ultimately Miss Marple solves the crime, bringing the culprits to justice and saving her friends from a life time of suspicion.
This 1941 work reflects small town English life and morals of the time. The reader needs to keep this mind and not try to see the story in a more contremporary light. It mattered very much at that time whether or not a couple was married or living in sin, teenage girls could be convinced that a talent scout could pick them out of a crowd and the suspicion of a middle-aged man's daliance with a young woman would lead to social exclusion for the whole family.
The plot is, as always in a Christie mystery, fairly laid out with all the clues available to the reader. While the reader may get a suspicion of a red herring and even narrow the field of suspects I doubt that any will arrive at all the answers before Miss Marple reveals all.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
ram ray
Agatha Christie (1890-1976) is the best known mystery novelist of the 20th Century--and with good reason, for when it came to plots, truly fiendish plots, she could easily out-construct all competitors. She also had a knack for writing tongue-in-cheek, exhibiting a sly sense of humor for those sharp enough to catch it. The 1942 THE BODY IN THE LIBRARY is an excellent example of both.

The title is a classic cliche, immediately bringing to mind an old fashioned whodunit of the Mary Roberts Rinehart type, the sort of novel in which an improbable victim is discovered in an impossible setting. But Christie twists the cliche, playing upon the idea in an darkly comic sort of way. After all, what would you do if you awoke one morning to find a bleached blonde strangled to death and tossed on the library floor before the fireplace?

As it happens--and most fortunately--Col. and Mrs. Bantry know an expert in all things homocidal: everyone's favorite spinster lady, Miss Marple. When the victim is traced to a nearby resort, Mrs. Bantry wastes little time in booking rooms for both Miss Marple and herself and the hunt is on, complete with a series of unbreakable alibis, hidden motives, and a classic Christie plot twist at the end.

THE BODY IN THE LIBRARY does not really compete with Christie's absolute best--but then few titles, regardless of author, do. But it is among her most witty works, a fast-paced read that can be swallowed whole in a single sitting. Recommended.

GFT, the store Reviewer
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
joshua pratt
This is the third Jane Marple book, but the first that I've read. I read this edition (Pocket book, 1970), and I was attracted to the initial romanticism of a dead body in a private library. Libraries are dark and notoriously eerie.

The book starts off hilariously, but quickly becomes an interesting investigation that shakes up a bourgeoise English town. I was suprised at how quiet Miss Marple is, and how much she sort of disappears into the background. It isn't until the end that she even begins raising her voice to get some answers.

The investigation itself is nothing new. People are questioned and the reader is led to believe the facts fit together. Miss Marple, of course, provides the fresh insight that ultimately twists everything around. "Why didn't I think of that?" becomes the embarrassing thought in every policeman's -- and reader's -- minds.

Unfortunately, this being the third Christie book I've read, I didn't get that thrilling feeling of following a murder case in an exotic locale. For this, I recommend And Then There Were None, or Murder on the Orient Express. Also, I've come to realize that, as a reader, I prefer multiple murders, serial killings, and inevitable doom. In The Body in the Library, we have nearly three murders, but I wanted more!

The book itself is an extremely easy and quick read, making for a great summer/travel read. My dictionary dash included meretricious (89) and prevaricate (133).
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
vicente
In the author's foreword to The Body in the Library Christie writes: "I laid down for myself certain conditions. The library in question must be a highly orthodox and conventional library. The body, on the other hand, must be a wildly improbably and highly sensational body."

Christie kept to her conditions, and the results were very nice indeed. Whenever I read a Miss Marple book that I really like, I say that "this is my favorite Miss Marple". But I really think that The Body in the Library may well be my actual favorite Miss Marple. I have read that Christie herself thought that it was the best opening she ever wrote.

What makes it a favorite? The contrasts between a flashy dead girl and the house in which she clearly does not belong are a part of it. It allows for a very nice exploration of life in St. Mary Mead. The characters are also top notch. The Bantrys are warm and funny, but still have their own depth. Conway Jefferson, permanently in mourning, is one of the most interesting characters in the Christie body of work. Still very nice to read after all these years.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
gretchen flueckiger
When the body of a young blonde woman is found in the library at Gossington Hall, the home's owners, Colonel and Mrs. Bantry are mystified. They have never seen the girl in their life; how could she have wound up murdered in their house? Mrs. Bantry calls in her good friend Miss Marple to search out the truth that several detectives cannot find, and bring the murderer to justice before he kills again.

Miss Marple is just as puzzled as the Bantrys as to why the blonde was found in their house. The victim, Ruby Keene, was a dancer at the local hotel and had fallen into the affection of a hotel visitor, the wealthy and crippled Conway Jefferson. His son-in-law and daughter-in-law definitely had means to murder Ruby, but their alibis are solid. And the other suspicious characters without alibis, have no motives for the killing. Miss Marple has her work cut out for her, but as usual, she rises to the challenge and surpasses the efforts of the local constable and a retired Scotland Yard detective.

"The Body in the Library" is a quick-paced, witty mystery. Agatha Christie uses several cliches in wonderful and clever plot twists as the mystery surrounding the murder begins to unravel. The ending seems a little rushed, and there are often too many detectives looking into the case, which is perhaps why Miss Marple outwits them all.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
prajjwal bhandari
The Body in the Library by Agatha Christie.

This is a cozy mystery worth enjoying while relaxing on a do nothing week-end.

Characters are well detailed as is their involvement with one another. The mystery is who and why was a murdered victim left in Mr. & Mrs. Bantry's library. No sooner are the local police called in to the Bantry residence to investigate then Mrs. Bantry notifies her long time friend, Miss Marple, and requests her assistance in the matter.

As the investigation proceeds and the acquaintances of the identified victim are questioned then another body is discovered in a burnt car.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
shivangi
Agatha Christie dedicated her 1941 crime novel, "The Body In the Library", with affection to her brother-in-law who had expressed a wish to find a body in the first chapter of her next book. Agatha Christie so contrived a response that the body could be found in the library at Gossington Hall, home of Colonel and Mrs Bantry, neighbors of her famous spinster sleuth Miss Marple.

Accordingly, readers can expect to be entertained by mystery and mayhem, fortified by tea and sympathy, culminating in a well-explained denouement. Many of this writer's former conjuring tricks as well as one or two new one are provided, framed in a setting that has similarities to that of Dorothy L Sayers' "Have His Carcase", and re-working a formula used previously in her own "Death On the Nile". You might, like me, consider that the writer withholds too much information that might facilitate identifying the guilty, but a check will show that she provides clues (although well hidden) during the entertainment.

As cozy as they come, and with less thrills and action than most, this is one of Agatha Christie's better middle order crime novels.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
nukhet
Many readers and critics have commented that the opening of Agatha Christie's "The Body in the Library" is not merely lighthearted but really funny. A sleeping couple is informed by an hysterical maid that there is a body in the library, a fact first the wife's and then her spouse's sleepy brain refuses to accept. Since neither of them have a clue who she is, we know we are off on a typically atypical Christie jaunt.
The tongue-in-cheek feeling you will detect in the first chapters is utterly proven when a young lad includes Christie's own name in a list of mystery writers who sent him their autograph. Even the detective's inappropriate name, Inspector Slack, adds to the humor of this lovely little mystery.
I notice that while the David Suchet television versions of the Poirot mysteries stray from the details of their sources, the Joan Hickson Miss Marple ones are fairly faithful. Therefore if you can get your hand on the HBO recording of this episode, you would probably enjoy reading the book first and then watching the video.
Or perhaps better still, you can now hear the entire novel read on Audio Partner tapes or CDs by that stalwart British actress, Stephanie Cole, who is best known as the crusty Diana Trent in "Waiting For God." Her deep voice can capture those of the male and female characters quite nicely; and while she does not go in for any grand displays of voice characterization (a problem when Christie does not identify the speaker during long exchanges), she is never less than arresting and a good choice for this sort of reading.
The playing clocks in at 5 hours, 23 minutes.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
eugene haston
Agatha Christie dedicated her 1941 crime novel, "The Body In the Library", with affection to her brother-in-law who had expressed a wish to find a body in the first chapter of her next book. Agatha Christie so contrived a response that the body could be found in the library at Gossington Hall, home of Colonel and Mrs Bantry, neighbors of her famous spinster sleuth Miss Marple.

Accordingly, readers can expect to be entertained by mystery and mayhem, fortified by tea and sympathy, culminating in a well-explained denouement. Many of this writer's former conjuring tricks as well as one or two new one are provided, framed in a setting that has similarities to that of Dorothy L Sayers' "Have His Carcase", and re-working a formula used previously in her own "Death On the Nile". You might, like me, consider that the writer withholds too much information that might facilitate identifying the guilty, but a check will show that she provides clues (although well hidden) during the entertainment.

As cozy as they come, and with less thrills and action than most, this is one of Agatha Christie's better middle order crime novels.
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
jcentra
One morning the body of a beautiful but rather cheap-looking girl is found in the library of Colonel and Mrs. Bantry at Gossington Hall. The Bantrys don't have a clue of the identity of this unfortunate girl. Luckily Miss Marple is there to help the police in their investigations and guide them politely to the discoveries that will solve this complex case.
Following Murder at the Vicarage (1930) and The Thirteen Problems (1932) this is Miss Jane Marples third appearance. Why Christie waited more than a decade to get back to her old spinster in 1942 remains unknown, but it might have something to do with the enormous popularity of her private detective with the little grey cells: Hercule Poirot.
The come-back of Miss Marple has not really the same spirit as the bulk of Agatha Christie pre-war books. It certainly lacks the freshness of Vicarage, although some characters from that book make their second appearance in The Body in the Library. The characters are drawn in the typical style that has become a trademark of Christie, so nothing wrong with that. The ending though is so utterly unlikely that is gives you a rather bitter aftertaste. From a whodunit point of view the end is neatly composed and proves the master ship of the Dame of Crime, but that is far from what real life is supposed to offer. I know, you shouldn't expect realistic story-lines if you open an Agatha Christie novel, but there are certain limits.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
carola
Just how did that body get in the library?
I bought this book after watching the recent ITV adaptation of it, which left me suspicious as to whether the ITV denouement was as penned by Agatha. My suspicions proved correct.
I'm not sure why ITV felt the need to change the original ending. Agatha Christie's is better and far more credible.
I know she has her detractors, but I still think her plots are far cleverer than people give her credit for. With its twists and turns, its subplots, mazes and red herrings, The Body in the Library is up there with the best of Mrs Christie.

The Night of Harrison Monk's Death: Jane Hetherington's Adventures in Detection: 1 (Volume 1)

The Magpie Murders - Omnibus Edition
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
skyla collier
A Solid Murder-Mystery

This Agatha Christie novel is a solid story with some very interesting characters. And best of all, it jumps right into the intrigue when Dolly Bantry, Mistress of Gossington Hall, is informed by her housemaid that a body has been found in the estate's library. From that point on, the cast of characters is introduced, and one-by-one they are added to the possible list of suspects - or at least people of interest.

Agatha Christie uses just the right touch of humor and suspense in this book. I consider it a classic that should be read by most school children. It is short enough to not intimidate the average reader, yet long enough to be a memorable read.

The motive and suspects are just vague enough to keep the reader guessing at "Who-dunnit?" the whole story. The only flaw in this book is that the reader is never really given enough information about one of the characters - Dinah Lee. Other than that, this is another must-read by Agatha Christie.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
ashraf
A charming mystery that entangles several members of a small bucolic township in England when a body is found in the library of a manor. Miss Marple is invited by a friend to investigate the crime and she uses her well learned knowledge of human nature to solve the murder The clever, modest, unassuming Miss Marple uses her special knowledge to perceive answers to the murder mystery.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
allaire
Miss Marple makes her second appearance in this novel. Her dear friends, Col. and Mrs. Bantry, have the unpleasant experience of having the body of a rather cheap-looking blonde found in their library. The unidentified corpse does not appear to be at all the type of person the Bantrys would associate with, and tongues begin wagging in the village. The search to identify the body involves many interesting characters: Ruby Keene, a professional dancer who has been reported missing; Josephine Turner, her cousin; Raymond Starr, exhibition dancer and tennis pro; and Conway Jefferson, a man confined to a wheelchair as the result of an accident that killed his wife and children. Mr. Jefferson was rumored to have been quite taken with the exotic Ruby. Add to this mix the Bantrys next door neighbor, Basil Blake, who is a "party animal" and been known to consort with film stars and others of loose reputations, according to the gossip-mongers in the village.
The professional detectives are baffled and it is our shy and quiet Miss Marple who solves the case because of her past experiences and observations of how people act, particularly young girls.
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
carla figueroa
I have read a lot of Agatha Christie's works. In fact, this one was part of a four book binge brought to you buy your public library.

This one falls back to the end of the line when it comes to ranking my favorites. I found the ending unsatisfying with some plot holes that others have mentioned. I also thought that a key piece of evidence was never explicitly presented to the reader, although I may have missed it's mention. I thought the motive was kind of flimsy, and that the characters didn't develop as deeply as in other novels.

All in all, I'd look somewhere else for a more satisfying crime novel. I recently finished The Crooked House and Five Little Pigs, which I would both recommend. And now, on to The Hollow!
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
joan drebing
I first read Agatha Christie's The Body In the Library several years ago, and to be honest, I really didn't like it very much (a rarity for a Christie book, as I am a huge fan of hers). On a whim, I decided to check out the audio edition (read by Stephanie Cole) at the library. I *loved* it! Cole does an absolutely marvelous job with all the characters, giving each a different inflection and filling each word with the appropriate emotion and feeling. Her Miss Marple is gentle yet spunky, and you can almost see the twinkle in her eyes. I became so engrossed in this audio book that I found myself sitting in my car several times, not wanting to get out because I wanted to continue to listen! I really, really recommend this audio book to anyone who enjoys a good mystery. Kudos to Stephanie Cole for such a fantastic reading!
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
roda sabay
This book is a great starter for Miss Marple-readers. Though many will disagree and say that MURDER OF THE VICARAGE is (considering it was published as the first Miss Marple-book), THE BODY IN THE LIBRARY introduces an interesting plot, multiple settings, and suspects with multiple motives. It introduces the usual blueprint that surrounds Miss Marple mysteries. There is a detective or inspector who goes around asking initial questions and such. There is a chief who gives updates on a daily basis. Usually, they all have something to do with(or know about)Miss Marple.

Miss Marple's great friend Mrs. Bantry and her husband Colonel Bantry wake up to a shocking sight: a blonde girl murdered brutally at Gossington Hall. The plot thickens, doesn't it always! Expect this book to give twists and turns at every corner and make you want to read every single one. This was in fact my first Miss Marple book, so I might be kind of bias. Buy this book with THE MIRROR CRACK'D {{sometimes referred to as THE MIRROR CRACK'D...FROM SIDE TO SIDE}} as Mrs. Bantry is introduced once again in this book and there's a new murder. Miss Marple is also involved in this one.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
james newman
Yet another wonderful whodoneit by a masterful writer. The plot twists kept me guessing, and Jane Marple had her work cut out for her. She solved the case, though, by adhering to the facts, by not trusting testimony from those who did not prove trustworthy. I also enjoyed the interactions between the strong (but insensitive) character of Mrs. Bantry and her sweet but clueless husband. Christie is also a masterful stylist: in her novels, not a single word is wasted. A delightful read.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
vanessa wiseman
This mystery is a quintessential Miss Marple mystery. It takes place in Miss Marple's village, there is a Colonel, a house, a touch of the exotic in the form of the identity of the victim, servants and Miss Marple herself. An unidentified body turns up in the library of a Colonel and his wife. You may find yourself reading the dialogue in English accents as it seems very English. This isn't the most original of Christie's plot, but it is solidly enjoyable. If you want an introduction to Miss Marple, you should consider this mystery novel.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
gabriel nicholas
"There's a body in the library." That's one of the first things Mrs. Bantry hears when she wakes up from her happy dream.

When a young blond woman, strangled, appears at the Bantry mansion. Mrs. Bantry has no one to turn to, exert Miss Marple.

While police officers Colonel Melchett and Inspector Slack are off interrogating suspects, Miss Marple is asking questions, making connections, and finding clues. She apparently has a knack for murders, by making comparisons with the crime to other issues like it in her small village, St. Mary Mead. Apparently, the name of the victim was Ruby Keen, a dancer from a nearby hotel. As Miss Marple and the officers muddle the case, secrets are revealed, and hidden jealousy is found. The locals that have been interrogated have said that a they didn't really know her much, only that she came from a studio in London. At the hotel, they said she was close friends with a Mr. Jefferson, and invalid who hung around the hotel a lot. When they talked to him, he said he was planning on adopting her, and in his will was leaving her 50,000 pounds. (In U.K money.) They also talked to Jeffersons son and daughter-in-law. It turns out they both despised her, and, jokingly, admitted that they wanted to strangle her. But, as they put it, "would never do that to Jefferson, it would break him." As the mystery deepens, who is wrong, and who is right?

The main characters in this story were: Miss Marple, Colonel Melchett, Colonel Bantry, Inspector Slack, and Sir Henry Clithering. Miss Marple is a quiet old lady who has a knack for solving murders by comparing them to local issues in her town. Inspector Slack is a intellectual detective who works with Colonel Melchett. Colonel Bantry is the husband of Mrs. Bantry, who comes with Colonel Melchett. He is a stern officer who helps discover the murderer. I think that the marl of this story is that with hard work, dedication, and a little bit of help, you can dig down and find the answer to anything. I think that this was a really good book, the plot was amazing, it wasn't all over the place, it wasn't confusing, and it's a book to have around when your in the mood for a chilling mystery.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
sarah martyn
Many readers and critics have commented that the opening of Agatha Christie's "The Body in the Library" is not merely lighthearted but really funny. A sleeping couple is informed by an hysterical maid that there is a body in the library, a fact first the wife's and then her spouse's sleepy brain refuses to accept. Since neither of them have a clue who she is, we know we are off on a typically atypical Christie jaunt.
The tongue-in-cheek feeling you will detect in the first chapters is utterly proven when a young lad includes Christie's own name in a list of mystery writers who sent him their autograph. Even the detective's inappropriate name, Inspector Slack, adds to the humor of this lovely little mystery.
I notice that while the David Suchet television versions of the Poirot mysteries stray from the details of their sources, the Joan Hickson Miss Marple ones are fairly faithful. Therefore if you can get your hand on the HBO recording of this episode, you would probably enjoy reading the book first and then watching the video.
Or perhaps better still, you can now hear the entire novel read on Audio Partner tapes or CDs by that stalwart British actress, Stephanie Cole, who is best known as the crusty Diana Trent in "Waiting For God." Her deep voice can capture those of the male and female characters quite nicely; and while she does not go in for any grand displays of voice characterization (a problem when Christie does not identify the speaker during long exchanges), she is never less than arresting and a good choice for this sort of reading.
The playing clocks in at 5 hours, 23 minutes.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
laddie
Agatha Christie dedicated her 1941 crime novel, "The Body In the Library", with affection to her brother-in-law who had expressed a wish to find a body in the first chapter of her next book. Agatha Christie so contrived a response that the body could be found in the library at Gossington Hall, home of Colonel and Mrs Bantry, neighbors of her famous spinster sleuth Miss Marple.

Accordingly, readers can expect to be entertained by mystery and mayhem, fortified by tea and sympathy, culminating in a well-explained denouement. Many of this writer's former conjuring tricks as well as one or two new one are provided, framed in a setting that has similarities to that of Dorothy L Sayers' "Have His Carcase", and re-working a formula used previously in her own "Death On the Nile". You might, like me, consider that the writer withholds too much information that might facilitate identifying the guilty, but a check will show that she provides clues (although well hidden) during the entertainment.

As cozy as they come, and with less thrills and action than most, this is one of Agatha Christie's better middle order crime novels.
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
kathina
One morning the body of a beautiful but rather cheap-looking girl is found in the library of Colonel and Mrs. Bantry at Gossington Hall. The Bantrys don't have a clue of the identity of this unfortunate girl. Luckily Miss Marple is there to help the police in their investigations and guide them politely to the discoveries that will solve this complex case.
Following Murder at the Vicarage (1930) and The Thirteen Problems (1932) this is Miss Jane Marples third appearance. Why Christie waited more than a decade to get back to her old spinster in 1942 remains unknown, but it might have something to do with the enormous popularity of her private detective with the little grey cells: Hercule Poirot.
The come-back of Miss Marple has not really the same spirit as the bulk of Agatha Christie pre-war books. It certainly lacks the freshness of Vicarage, although some characters from that book make their second appearance in The Body in the Library. The characters are drawn in the typical style that has become a trademark of Christie, so nothing wrong with that. The ending though is so utterly unlikely that is gives you a rather bitter aftertaste. From a whodunit point of view the end is neatly composed and proves the master ship of the Dame of Crime, but that is far from what real life is supposed to offer. I know, you shouldn't expect realistic story-lines if you open an Agatha Christie novel, but there are certain limits.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
natasha kuchirka
Just how did that body get in the library?
I bought this book after watching the recent ITV adaptation of it, which left me suspicious as to whether the ITV denouement was as penned by Agatha. My suspicions proved correct.
I'm not sure why ITV felt the need to change the original ending. Agatha Christie's is better and far more credible.
I know she has her detractors, but I still think her plots are far cleverer than people give her credit for. With its twists and turns, its subplots, mazes and red herrings, The Body in the Library is up there with the best of Mrs Christie.

The Night of Harrison Monk's Death: Jane Hetherington's Adventures in Detection: 1 (Volume 1)

The Magpie Murders - Omnibus Edition
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
bronwyn
A Solid Murder-Mystery

This Agatha Christie novel is a solid story with some very interesting characters. And best of all, it jumps right into the intrigue when Dolly Bantry, Mistress of Gossington Hall, is informed by her housemaid that a body has been found in the estate's library. From that point on, the cast of characters is introduced, and one-by-one they are added to the possible list of suspects - or at least people of interest.

Agatha Christie uses just the right touch of humor and suspense in this book. I consider it a classic that should be read by most school children. It is short enough to not intimidate the average reader, yet long enough to be a memorable read.

The motive and suspects are just vague enough to keep the reader guessing at "Who-dunnit?" the whole story. The only flaw in this book is that the reader is never really given enough information about one of the characters - Dinah Lee. Other than that, this is another must-read by Agatha Christie.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
moriah
A charming mystery that entangles several members of a small bucolic township in England when a body is found in the library of a manor. Miss Marple is invited by a friend to investigate the crime and she uses her well learned knowledge of human nature to solve the murder The clever, modest, unassuming Miss Marple uses her special knowledge to perceive answers to the murder mystery.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
maura spignesi
Miss Marple makes her second appearance in this novel. Her dear friends, Col. and Mrs. Bantry, have the unpleasant experience of having the body of a rather cheap-looking blonde found in their library. The unidentified corpse does not appear to be at all the type of person the Bantrys would associate with, and tongues begin wagging in the village. The search to identify the body involves many interesting characters: Ruby Keene, a professional dancer who has been reported missing; Josephine Turner, her cousin; Raymond Starr, exhibition dancer and tennis pro; and Conway Jefferson, a man confined to a wheelchair as the result of an accident that killed his wife and children. Mr. Jefferson was rumored to have been quite taken with the exotic Ruby. Add to this mix the Bantrys next door neighbor, Basil Blake, who is a "party animal" and been known to consort with film stars and others of loose reputations, according to the gossip-mongers in the village.
The professional detectives are baffled and it is our shy and quiet Miss Marple who solves the case because of her past experiences and observations of how people act, particularly young girls.
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
janet
I have read a lot of Agatha Christie's works. In fact, this one was part of a four book binge brought to you buy your public library.

This one falls back to the end of the line when it comes to ranking my favorites. I found the ending unsatisfying with some plot holes that others have mentioned. I also thought that a key piece of evidence was never explicitly presented to the reader, although I may have missed it's mention. I thought the motive was kind of flimsy, and that the characters didn't develop as deeply as in other novels.

All in all, I'd look somewhere else for a more satisfying crime novel. I recently finished The Crooked House and Five Little Pigs, which I would both recommend. And now, on to The Hollow!
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
chad roskelley
I first read Agatha Christie's The Body In the Library several years ago, and to be honest, I really didn't like it very much (a rarity for a Christie book, as I am a huge fan of hers). On a whim, I decided to check out the audio edition (read by Stephanie Cole) at the library. I *loved* it! Cole does an absolutely marvelous job with all the characters, giving each a different inflection and filling each word with the appropriate emotion and feeling. Her Miss Marple is gentle yet spunky, and you can almost see the twinkle in her eyes. I became so engrossed in this audio book that I found myself sitting in my car several times, not wanting to get out because I wanted to continue to listen! I really, really recommend this audio book to anyone who enjoys a good mystery. Kudos to Stephanie Cole for such a fantastic reading!
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
lynn ellen
This book is a great starter for Miss Marple-readers. Though many will disagree and say that MURDER OF THE VICARAGE is (considering it was published as the first Miss Marple-book), THE BODY IN THE LIBRARY introduces an interesting plot, multiple settings, and suspects with multiple motives. It introduces the usual blueprint that surrounds Miss Marple mysteries. There is a detective or inspector who goes around asking initial questions and such. There is a chief who gives updates on a daily basis. Usually, they all have something to do with(or know about)Miss Marple.

Miss Marple's great friend Mrs. Bantry and her husband Colonel Bantry wake up to a shocking sight: a blonde girl murdered brutally at Gossington Hall. The plot thickens, doesn't it always! Expect this book to give twists and turns at every corner and make you want to read every single one. This was in fact my first Miss Marple book, so I might be kind of bias. Buy this book with THE MIRROR CRACK'D {{sometimes referred to as THE MIRROR CRACK'D...FROM SIDE TO SIDE}} as Mrs. Bantry is introduced once again in this book and there's a new murder. Miss Marple is also involved in this one.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
nilanjona
Yet another wonderful whodoneit by a masterful writer. The plot twists kept me guessing, and Jane Marple had her work cut out for her. She solved the case, though, by adhering to the facts, by not trusting testimony from those who did not prove trustworthy. I also enjoyed the interactions between the strong (but insensitive) character of Mrs. Bantry and her sweet but clueless husband. Christie is also a masterful stylist: in her novels, not a single word is wasted. A delightful read.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
gabriel
This mystery is a quintessential Miss Marple mystery. It takes place in Miss Marple's village, there is a Colonel, a house, a touch of the exotic in the form of the identity of the victim, servants and Miss Marple herself. An unidentified body turns up in the library of a Colonel and his wife. You may find yourself reading the dialogue in English accents as it seems very English. This isn't the most original of Christie's plot, but it is solidly enjoyable. If you want an introduction to Miss Marple, you should consider this mystery novel.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
jenell
"There's a body in the library." That's one of the first things Mrs. Bantry hears when she wakes up from her happy dream.

When a young blond woman, strangled, appears at the Bantry mansion. Mrs. Bantry has no one to turn to, exert Miss Marple.

While police officers Colonel Melchett and Inspector Slack are off interrogating suspects, Miss Marple is asking questions, making connections, and finding clues. She apparently has a knack for murders, by making comparisons with the crime to other issues like it in her small village, St. Mary Mead. Apparently, the name of the victim was Ruby Keen, a dancer from a nearby hotel. As Miss Marple and the officers muddle the case, secrets are revealed, and hidden jealousy is found. The locals that have been interrogated have said that a they didn't really know her much, only that she came from a studio in London. At the hotel, they said she was close friends with a Mr. Jefferson, and invalid who hung around the hotel a lot. When they talked to him, he said he was planning on adopting her, and in his will was leaving her 50,000 pounds. (In U.K money.) They also talked to Jeffersons son and daughter-in-law. It turns out they both despised her, and, jokingly, admitted that they wanted to strangle her. But, as they put it, "would never do that to Jefferson, it would break him." As the mystery deepens, who is wrong, and who is right?

The main characters in this story were: Miss Marple, Colonel Melchett, Colonel Bantry, Inspector Slack, and Sir Henry Clithering. Miss Marple is a quiet old lady who has a knack for solving murders by comparing them to local issues in her town. Inspector Slack is a intellectual detective who works with Colonel Melchett. Colonel Bantry is the husband of Mrs. Bantry, who comes with Colonel Melchett. He is a stern officer who helps discover the murderer. I think that the marl of this story is that with hard work, dedication, and a little bit of help, you can dig down and find the answer to anything. I think that this was a really good book, the plot was amazing, it wasn't all over the place, it wasn't confusing, and it's a book to have around when your in the mood for a chilling mystery.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
momo
Agatha Christie novel's always seem to just fly by, not matter their length. I am fairly certain, though, that The Body in the Library is Christie's shortest novel. As a result, it's an especially quick and quickly-paced read, with the plot taking whip-sharp turns in each chapter. But despite the novel's tortuousness, it does not lack at all for neat logic and a satisfying denouement. In fact, this is an extremely satisfying mystery, complete with a complex crime, acute psychological observations and characterizations, and a creative crime solving from Miss Marple. This novel served as sort of an introduction to Agatha Christie's mysteries, and I'm sure that it would be an excellent read for any of her readers, new or old.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
eric sazer
Agatha Christie's the Body in the Library is truly a great mystery book. Of course, Agatha Christie does not need any additional praise from humble me to boost her reputation as an unparallelled author of mysteries. In this book, the corpse of a young woman is found in the library of Gossington Hall, the home of a well-to-do colonel and his wife. Miss Marple, in conjunction with the police, sets out to investigate. She comes upon many discoveries, and it can be seen that many parties benefit from the death of the woman in the library and/or have the opportunity to kill her. As the investigations progress, a possibly related incident occurs: a car burned to shrapnel in a neighboring region. Miss Marple, of course, with her impeccable investigative prowess and sharp eye for detail, solves the mystery methodically and impressively. The outcome is dazzling and this book is a great read for all mystery-lovers out there.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
derick
Many Agatha Christie fans love Hercule Poirot and detest Miss Jane Marple. I love them both, and after many re-readings of the Christie canon, I think overall I prefer Miss Marple. "The Body in the Library" is one of the books that nudges me toward the Miss Marple camp.

The plot is one of Christie's best. Characters are above average. The pacing is excellent. The humor sparkles. This is definitely a "fair play" detective story. I don't want to spoil the plot by giving out any clues, but Miss Marple herself states that you shouldn't believe what people say. Even with Miss Marple's warning I let Miss Christie lead me down the garden path.

Agatha Christie is the best, and "The Body in the Library" is one of her best. Read and enjoy.
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
sophie avakian
In her second full-length Miss Marple mystery, Agatha Christie once again shocked the quiet village of St Mary Mead with the appearance of a body in the library of a well-to-do home. Neither of the owners know who the dead girl is, nor how she came to be deceased in their house, and when the wife calls neighbor Miss Marple by to visit her and help figure out how this confusion came to be, you know you're in for a good mystery.

When the dead body is identified as a dancer from a nearby resort, Miss Marple and Mrs Bantry (the homeowner's wife) travel to the hotel to try and ascertain who would want the young girl dead and why on earth they chose to put her in Colonel Bantry's library. While there, they unwrap a series of strange family dynamics involving an ill wealthy widower, his ne'er-do-well son-in-law, his quiet daughter-in-law, his precocious step-grandson, as well as the dead girl's cousin. Combine that with a local missing girl scout and you have a case that is tangled in more knots than a ratty shoelace.

Of course, Miss Marple, along with the inspectors from the police and Scotland Yard, are able to untangle the problems and come to the heart of the matter. Unfortunately, this one doesn't leave as many clues for the reader as some of Christie's other works, but it's sill a delightful peek into a sleepy way of life long-gone.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
zrinka
As a teenager, I devoured one Miss Marple mystery after the other, feeling all the time slmildly uneasy for wasting my time on such fluff. But as I grow older and read more and better, and as I'm less influenced by the opinion of the powers that be, Agatha Christie grows in my mind.

Miss Marple is one of the most popular literary figures of the 20th Century, and yet she does not have the literary status of Sherlock Holmes. She's not required reading in high school literature courses, and she should be.

Agatha Christie created an entire litererary genre, which is not the same as the genre created by Conan Doyle (whose unabridged Sherlock Holmes I'ver read with great pleasure cover to cover three times). I think it's fair to say that in some significant way, her mysteries are more similar to the novels of Jane Austen than to those of Conan Doyle. Austen and Christie are fundamentally all about the motivations in human psychology. Where Holmes looks at a person's fingernails and deduces she is a musician, Christie watches a couple quarrel, and deduces they are really married, though they pretend otherwise. For her, such evidence is as solid as a footprint, and based on it, conclusions can be drawn.

Nevertheless, she does revert to simple forensic evidence before convicting anyone. Her plots are always complicated, but Christie always provides a unique solution. If she did not, she would not be great. In th case of the Body in the Library, there is as usual all sorts of evidence floating around to confuse you and occupy your mind, but 3 pieces of evidence in the end identify the murderer uniquely.

An inattentive reader might finish the book concluding that had Christie modified the plot just a little, the outcome might have been different. Not so. Not any more than Dorothy could have stayed in Oz or Hamlet survived. Christie creates an entire self-consistent and carefully planned microcosm of motivations. However, in this case, the identities are veiled, the dynamo which drives the plot is the who-done-it. In this regard, her genre, of course, is in Doyle's tradition.

And I so much like Miss Marple as a literary figure -- the enlightened being, British style. She lives in British society with its commoners and gentry, but is somehow neither. She easily consorts and sympathizes with both. She seeks neither wealth nor fame. She is content, fearless. Her mind and emotions are steady without being cold. And she does not pass judgement on her fellow man, though she stands unflinching in the face of justice -- Nemesis, she is called in one novel. She always knows who did it at the precise moment when all the evidence is in. In this case, that happened when the little boy showed her the clipped nails. Inspector Slack dismisses him as irrelevant. Marple does not. To her all men are created equal. Yet each is unique and understood on his or her own terms. Best of all, Christie accomplishes this through a truly endearing personality -- one with a penchant for tea and herbaceous borders, and a tendency, like most of us, to slip a stitch, though most of hers are literal rather than metaphorical
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
anji
What "improvements" have been made for the Black Dog & Leventhal edition? There are already major differences in punctuation, word choices, and scene breaks between the original Collins and Dodd Mead editions of this novel. There are further differences between the Dodd Mead editions republished by Random House/Avenel and the Dodd Mead editions republished by Simon & Shuster/Pocket. There are further additions still in the Signet, Bantam, and Berkley editions. For every publishing house putting out her works, there seem to be a new batch of editors altering Agatha Christie's words and the sound of her voice. What's the matter with these publishers? Whose voice do they think we want to hear when we sit down to a novel by Agatha Christie? And what will she sound like twenty years from now? It's frightening that her estate has failed to see the importance of guarding her words as she wrote them. Please tell me I'm not the only one here who senses that a crime has been committed.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
abbystar1201
This is my first Agatha Christie book. I have been informed by many people that I would love Agatha Christie's books. I admit that is true. I started The Body in the Library this morning. Every free moment I had I was reading the book.

How would you react to finding a body in your library? I don't know if I would be as calm as the woman in this book. Mrs. Bantry was thrilled with finding a body in her library. This was her chance to be a sleuth. That is what she was eager for.

The Body in the Library is a Miss Marple Mystery. Miss Marple is the sleuth in the village of St. Mary Mead. Mrs. Bantry calls Miss Marple up to the house when the body is found.

I enjoyed the book except for the parts that were written in French. Since I have never taken French some of the jokes were lost on me. Ms. Christie's writing style is one that is new to me. The book was a nice easy week end read.

5 stars since I didn't know until the very end who the murderer was..
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
hadi nor
The well-ordered world of Colonel and Mrs. Bantry is turned on its ear one morning when the body of a young woman is found in their library. Neither the Bantrys nor their staff knew the young woman, Ruby Keene, a dance hostess at the nearby Majestic Hotel. Fearing what the whispers in the village will do to her husband's reputation, Dolly Bantry calls her friend and sleuth, Miss Jane Marple. She and Miss Marple check in to the Majestic Hotel and begin investigating. They meet Conway Jefferson, an old man who had been planning to adopt the victim, and his young in-laws, all survivors of an accident that killed Jefferson's children. Ruby's cousin Josie also works at the hotel, having gotten Ruby the job when she hurt her ankle. Additional suspects are the too-handsome dance instructor, a poorly-spoken young guest of the hotel, and a neighbor of the Bantrys who throws too many film industry parties his neighbors do not approve of. In the end, Miss Marple has the whole thing figured out well in advance of the police, who fall for an obvious red herring before she straightens them out.

Christie writes with typical British wit and humor, wry observations appearing here and there, such as a reference to a woman who regularly ministered to the poor, no matter how hard they tried to avoid her. Miss Marple's character is smarter than everyone else, but not in the least arrogant about it, finding effusive praise somewhat trying and deflecting any boastful claims about her abilities.

An enjoyable read, I recommend this book for a quiet afternoon or evening when it can suck you right into polite English country society and amuse with its light sense of humor. It's easy to see why Christie's books have such timeless appeal.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
sebom
This book by Agatha Christie is very interesting. When you read this book, it feels like that you are one of the policemen investigating this case. People who likes to read mystery must read this book.
This book is about a body of a beautiful blonde girl had been discovered in the hearth-rug in Gossington Hall, the place where Colonel Bantry lived. They did not know that girl and have no clue how did she got into Gossington Hall. Colonel Melchett was responsible for this case. Later, he identified that the girl was named Ruby Keene, and she was a dancer at the Majestic Hotel. The policemen questioned everyone who knew Ruby Keene. Meanwhile, Mrs. Bantry wanted to solve this case by herself, so she called an old friend called Jane Marple and asked her to help in investigating the case.They searched for clues for many days and Jane Marple was positive that she knew who was the murderer. She decided to make a trap and catch that villian once and for all. If you wanted to know what happened, read the book yourself.
This is my first time reading books from Agatha Christie. My friend said that it was very good and suggested me to read one of her books. Now, I recommend this book to every mystery lovers in the whole universe.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
jaana ylikangas
Miss Marple is called to the home of her friend Dolly Bantry when a dead body is discovered in the library. The body is that of a young girl and Dolly is afraid that her husband will be accused of the crime. Miss Marple does some sleuthing, along with some professional investigators, and of course she comes up with the solution to the crime before they do. All of the usual motives of love and money are involved and the solution is a typical complex web which is common to Agatha Christie's mysteries. This book is not quite as ingenious as others in the series and moves at a somewhat slow pace, so it doesn't rate 5 stars, but it is a good read nevertheless.
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
jenjens
Great read for a rainy afternoon, however... There is a major flaw in this book. Don't read below if you haven't yet read it. Also, too many investigators (Inspector Slack, Superintendent Harper, Colonel Melchett, Sir Henry Clithering) plus Miss Marple, who comes across as more spinsterish than usual in this novel.

***SPOILER***clue
(Josie's ankle, which I picked up on right away. If she had indeed damaged her ankle, how could she have carried a body? If she hadn't hurt her ankle, why did she bring in Ruby Keene to replace her? Big hmm...)
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
lorena
I don't know why anyone would buy a book by Agatha Christie expecting sex and violence. Her style was to create the atmosphere of an English village before 1935 and to create a puzzle involving the death of someone in the village. Her detectives don't beat anyone up or make love to the suspects. Her detective is given the same clues that the reader sees, and in the last chapter, the detective weaves the relevant clues into the solution. In The Body in the Library, the detective is Jane Marple, an elderly spinster who uses a sharp mind so solve the puzzle. I like the early Jane Marple mysteries; The Body in the Library is fairly typical. You might find this book more enjoyable if you first read The Murder at the Vicarage.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
faith wallis
This mystery is a quintessential Miss Marple mystery. It takes place in Miss Marple's village, there is a Colonel, a house, a touch of the exotic in the form of the identity of the victim, servants and Miss Marple herself. You may find yourself reading the dialogue in English accents as it seems very English. If you want an introduction to Miss Marple, this may be a selection to consider.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
alex
This is a most enjoyable book, as are all Agatha Christie books. I believe I read them all when I was a teenager; I was enthralled! I am now (as is my husband) re-reading them and we remain delighted with them all!

I feel very comfortable recommending this book, and any Agatha Christie book, to the lover of mysteries!

Wonderful books, all!!!
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
erika piquero
This is a well-written story, with an interesting but not overwhelmingly intricate plot line, and it is really enhanced by Stephanie Cole's reading. Her voices for the characters are different enough so that you know who's speaking, but not at all overdone. It's quite amazing that she can believably personify so many characters of varying ages, genders, and classes.

As for the story, it is classic Christie. Even though it takes place in a very different world from the present one, you care about the characters and what they're going through. It's always fun to guess at the murderer as the story goes along, but Christie once again manages to come up with a surprising ending.

Excellent entertainment!
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
angie williams
"Oh, ma'am, oh, ma'am, there's a body in the library!"

Mary, the usually calm maid, is unfortunate enough to find the body of a dead girl in the middle of the Bantry's library. Nobody recognizes the murdered girl. She doesn't belong in the sleepy town of St. Mary Mead. Miss Jane Marple, the inquisitive investigator, whose forte is the ability to draw connections in human nature between suspects and villagers in St. Mary Mead, is brought into the case by her friend Dolly Bantry. The local police are also hot on the trail of the suspects. The body is identified as that of Ruby Keene, a young dancer at the Majestic Hotel. The list of suspects include: Basil Blake, an obnoxious young man; Mark Gaskell and Adelaide Jefferson, whose inheritance would be in jeopardy if Ruby Keene was adopted by Conway Jefferson, their father-in-law; Josephine Turner, Ruby's distant cousin; George Bartlett, a guest at the Majestic where Ruby worked; and Raymond Starr, a dancer at the Majestic.

Agatha Christie, the author of this book, takes us on an exciting adventure to unravel the mystery of Ruby Keene's murder. In her usual fashion, Agatha Christie keeps us in suspense until the very end. I've read several of Agatha Christie's murder mysteries, and I was not disappointed with this book. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys murder mysteries.

Miss Marple and Hercule Poirot are two of Agatha Christie's unforgettable characters. Miss Marple stories revolve in and around St. Mary Mead, a quaint little English town. Poirot on the other hand, travels all over Europe to solve mysteries.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
marigold
Ms. Agatha and Miss Marple stumped me again. Disregard the negative reviews written previously, this is vintage Christie when she was at a peak. Miss Marple and her ability to spot when people are lying, once again save the police from making the obvious error. Basically she doesn't believe anyone and begins to weed the facts thus. And I DO NOT OVER EMPHASIZE that the many suspects tell many lies in attempt to cover up anything that may humilate them. Fascinating study of human character.
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
virginia messina
This may be more engaging as a 'real read' than as an audio listen, so I will add my 2-cents: fine for commuting, but somewhat dissatisfying audio book - average with Stephanie Cole. As to the story, (1) predictability is really quite tenuous, and (2) character development provides few whom the listener can 'love.' Reason to care about the body in the library? A sweet young thing pretty much covers it. A bit of fun is had when Miss Marple unravels the case in closing, showing all the pert signs of a sweet, perceptive and well-grounded English villager.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
e ashman
I picked this up, half-way kidding to show my mom (who is going to be a librarian) when I was looking for a book for my sophomore English class. I decided to check it out with about 10 other books and I eventually chose it to read. I ended up really enjoying it. Her plot is so interwoven and threw me off the trail of the murderer many times. The characters felt real to me and I am looking forward to reading another one of her novels.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
marc morales
This is a good mystery. Miss Marple is right in the midst of all the action. My only complaint is that as Miss Marple is explaining how the murderer committed the crime she states they did something which must have been impossible. I can't go into more detail without ruining the mystery. It's still a good book. Very suspenseful.
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
marko ruostetoja
This was supposed to be a Miss Marple mystery. She was never even brought into the story until almost the end of the book. Shouldn't be listed as a Miss Marple mystery in my opinion. she has written better books than this.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
laura miller
An early Miss Marple. In the author’s note at the beginning, Christie says she wanted to take a common mystery cliché — to wit, the discovery of a body in the library — and turn it inside out. I thought she accomplished her goal, as instead of all the suspects being concentrated in the house where the body is found, we are soon transported several miles away to a hotel that seems to be a hive of possible murderers. I thought Marple was well-used in this one, and the solution to the mystery was pretty satisfying. That’s why she’s the queen of mystery, I reckon.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
nikita torane
It was amazing that how a body is found in a library and then how Miss Marple twists you and then when you think you know who did it you're wrong. You start to think that the characters are real and by the way Agatha Christie weaves the plot to make it different. Great suspenseful book!
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
ellen
I have been following this series with a lot of excitment. I love this writer and have enjoyed all of her books. I know you will too. If you haven't tried one of her great mysteries you should. You have no idea what an entertaining time you are missing.
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
firda yanda
This book was the first Agatha Christie book I read, and I thought it was boaring. So I thought that Christie wasent a really good writer. But then I read some of her other books, and they were great! I recomend to all: Don't read this book. I think you will find it boaring. (I want to get in contact with other Agatha Christie fans. I am a 12 yeard old girl from Norway.)
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
jenn wayboer
One of my favorite Agatha Christie books! It's kind of slowpaced, but nonetheless, had my head spinning in circles, just like any other of Dame Agatha Christie's books. I enjoy this kind of book, less action filled and more... realistic.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
stephanie
A will written mystery with interesting well developed characters, fast moving story line, and an unexpected ending. I would recommend this book and series too anyone who enjoys a well written mystery. Enjoy reading
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
franzi303
I confess to absolutely loving Dame Agatha's Miss Marple books. I suppose I find the coziness of them soothing. I enjoyed this one because of the presence of Col. & Mrs. Bantry but it was not quite up to par with most of her others. Miss Marple's character becomes more rounded as we see her interact with her friends. I agree with those readers who noted less "action" in this book, but I don't think that dooms it to being a bad book--it's just a change of pace, which is often refreshing.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
ferndk kaufman
Excellent story, very good character development, with a plot and time line easy to follow. And, only a reasonable use of middle English words and expressions, facilitating a good reading experience for an American reader in the 21st century. take care
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
sean spencer
I have been an Agatha Christie fan for years. Ms. Christie's writing style & novels are fantastic as she is truly a master of the mystery genre.

"The Body in the Library" is a wonderful example of Ms. Christie's writing technique. The characters, the plot, and dialogue are all wonderfully developed in "The Body in the Library". And as with most Agatha Christie novels, I am always left guessing who the true killer is until it is revealed at the very end of the novel.
★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
lillibet moore
Page after page of shallow character development would be tolerable if the characters weren't so utterly boring.

Not a typical Christie yarn. Very little development of the mystery - except for page after page of people who aren't Miss Marple speculating. No puzzles to unravel. Just endless details about these boring characters until the end.
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
rich taylor
I have to admit this was my first Agatha Christie book ever. I was quite surprised that Miss Marple didn't have much of a role in the book. It reminded me why I don't generally like historical mysteries. I enjoyed the book but I probably won't read Agatha Christie again.
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
silly
I am almost reluctant to write this review as the vast majority of reviews are glowing with praise for the author. I found the book interesting enough that I couldn't put it down once I got about halfway through and continued reading into the wee hours of the morning until I had finished. At that point, I was very confused. This book deals with two murders, one of which makes perfectly good sense (to the murderers and the reader) as the victim's death will prevent the victim from receiving a large amount of money which will go to the perpetrators instead. The other death involves a young village girl lured to a hotel by the murderers and also killed. The clothing of the two victims is exchanged, one body ends up in the library of a respectable couple and the other body ends up in a stolen vehicle which is set of fire so that the body can be identified only by a shoe and a button. The death of the young village girl made no sense to me, nor did the exchange of clothing, nor did setting one of the bodies on fire, since identification of the victim would be necessary for the murderers to inherit the large amount of money. I reread the book carefully thinking that I had missed some important clues, but I didn't find what I was looking for. Perhaps I am exceptionally dense, but I was disappointed that the book provided no logical reason that I could discern for the murder of the village teen-ager.
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