Death and Brain Surgery - Do No Harm - Stories of Life

By Henry Marsh

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Readers` Reviews

★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
zarah
Enjoyed reading from the perspective of a neurosurgeon since I am a nurse but probably not for everyone. He also shows a side of government run health care that Americans think they would like but I truly doubt that after reading this book.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
ruben rodriguez ii
A candid reflection of a neurosurgeon about his experience in dealing with people. Easy read and provides a glimpse into the difficulties of his profession. I recommend this book to get an idea of what it is like in his world.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
socraticgadfly
As a physician, I enjoy listening to accounts of other physicians' perspectives. Mr. Marsh has had a long, and illustrious career and has some moving personal stories, thoughtfully written. My one quibble is the lack of an overarching theme or narrative developed as a synthesis of his experience.
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★ ★ ★ ★ ★
carolina
It is not often a professional shares intimate details of his skills and their successes and failures, as well as the vagaries of regulation and how they affect his work a day world. Henry Marsh does all that for his job as a neuro surgeon and it makes for a thoughtful and captivating read. We could all some day be patients of him and his colleagues, and this book provide some things to reflect upon for us!
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
elizabeth fraser
Henry Marsh is a self-effacing , honest British neurosurgeon. Each case he presents is fascinating in its own way. Marsh looks beyond medical conditions to investigate the humanity of his patients. I was sorry to see this book come to an end.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
caleb trimble
Fascinating on many levels. Tip: do watch the documentary mentioned at the end of the book. The English Surgeon. Excerpts on YouTube, and full version on the store or Netflix. You get to see Dr. Marsh in the Ukraine. I think best to read the book first.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
nouf92
Although the book describes in detail life and death in which any of us would want to find ourselves in, I think Dr. Marsh finds a way to do it with empathy and feel for his patients. I certainly enjoyed learning a little more about the world of medicine.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
kailee
I like the obvious honesty, authenticity and integrity of the writer and the fact that his personality shines through his words.
I would recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in the meaning of life and of how we all eventually have to approach death.
An excellent book interesting, thoughtful and inspiring.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
eric tonjes
This a very unusual account of his professional life and attitudes by a Neurosurgeon because he is so honest and his technical explanations are so clear. Every health professional can relate to his anxieties about his operation outcomes, his difficulties in giving patients bad news and his repeatedly reviewing his decisions. This is an inspiring book.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
mateo mpinduzi mott
A lovely collection of anecdotes and wise incites on human frailty. Interesting incites also of a dedicated clinicians frustration with administrative interference and strictures.Looking forward to the sequel.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
brett
A lovely collection of anecdotes and wise incites on human frailty. Interesting incites also of a dedicated clinicians frustration with administrative interference and strictures.Looking forward to the sequel.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
roger gregory
Marsh lets us behind the operating door, but keeps us at arms length... As all successful doctors do. We hear more about successes than failures, and sure we're told of complications, but those are always laughed off or rationalized away.

A great book for those looking for anecdotes and bits of info about real medicine; and incredibly enjoyable and entertaining, but don't expect soul-baring confessions.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
doug w warren
This was an extremely well-written and interesting book. I liked Dr. Marsh's sense of humor and his writing style. Obviously, the outcomes for brain cancer are not very good but yet there were some wonderful stories where some of his patients survived and thrived. I had difficulty putting the book down. It is definitely worth reading.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
frantxu
He shares his personal experience honestly.
The book gives a perspective on what it takes to keep going as you try to help others in this challenging discipline.
On a par with "When the air hits the brain"
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
hesper
Having a friend with inoperable brain cancer, I found this book very interesting. It to shows the agonies and frustrations of the doctors who want to cure all patients but can't. It was heartfelt and I hope for a cure as much as the doctors do.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
adothompson
As someone who has several disabilities I have often found myself angry with doctors. However, this book was very humanizing. It is easy to forget that doctors are people too. The book was well structured and written. I finished it in about 2 days. For those interested in the behind-the-scenes of the surgery world, you will love this book.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
tanmay
Fascinating autobiography of a leading British neurosurgeon whose background is unorthodox. It also provides an accurate view of a single-payer system--which is STILL far, far better than the American healthcare system.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
laura mccaskill
I was fascinated by the way Henry Marsh wrote this book. He described some of the many complex, dangerous tumors (both malignant and non-malignant) that can happen in the human brain. He also talks about the many successful surgeries he has performed and also some of the great uncertainties in neurosurgery. Dr. Marsh seems to be a very caring physician who truly loves being a neurosurgeon.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
zach webb
A fine, autobiographical account of the life, career, and international charity work of a neurosurgeon.
Marsh shares the successes, failures, and challenges of surgeries and health systems in England and Ukraine.
He never forgets - and tries to teach his students - that patients are people not cases. He shares insights on
some of the issues that face people and families when deciding on surgery and the quality of life.
There are many stories here and they are told with clarity, compassion, and honesty.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
guy haley
This book is a magnificant description of the management of risk, how mistakes are unacceptable but inevitable, and deserve deep reflection. Although about medicine its message is applicable to business and other human endeavour. It was difficult to put down. The wise observation that carrying out the operation is not the difficilt part, deciding to take action is much more difficult; remains in my mind
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
marie cheng yu
An interesting recounting of a brain surgeon's professional experience. There is, I believe, an honest recounting of failures as well as successes. A lot can go unexpectedly wrong during brain surgery.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
magdy badr
A brilliant book written by a very human, human being. Easily understood by a person like me who is not medically educated. I was not a patient of his (I live in the North of England) but he agreed to look at my scan 15 years ago and corrected a mis-diagnosed condition, thereby giving me a life to enjoy. So glad I heard about his book on the radio. I totally understand the gratitude of the thousands of patients who have benefitted from his expertise.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
theresa g marone
Henry Marsh presents with eloquence and honesty the dilemmas that physicians and surgeons face when treating patients, and shows the human side of what it means to be a doctor. His experience as shared in this book is invaluable and it is recommended reading for health care providers and laypeople alike.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
glenda standish
The author is a well-accomplished neurosurgeon and has had many exciting adventures into the human brain. I enjoyed his manner of expression and description of what he saw and subsequently did for his patients. A good read.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
emma marion
Henry Marsh presents with eloquence and honesty the dilemmas that physicians and surgeons face when treating patients, and shows the human side of what it means to be a doctor. His experience as shared in this book is invaluable and it is recommended reading for health care providers and laypeople alike.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
craig louis
The author is a well-accomplished neurosurgeon and has had many exciting adventures into the human brain. I enjoyed his manner of expression and description of what he saw and subsequently did for his patients. A good read.
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
admod
Well-written and packed with information about his surgical experiences. Feel as though I learned a great deal while enjoying his descriptions of patients with whom he has worked. Appreciated his basic honesty concerning his growth from a hubristic young surgeon to a wise, caring physician who really strove to do no harm.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
manda b
This book was absolutely fascinating and extremely difficult to put down. Dr. Marsh truly cares about his patient outcomes and loves what he does. He is exhillerated by his work and each surgery is an adventure to him. I highly recommend this book for medically trained people as well as laymen. I am going to let it settle for a bit and will go back and re-read it.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
bert
This heart-felt tale of the trials and tribulations of being a neurosurgeon was a breath of fresh air. Including his failures along with his successes and personal experience made this a wonderful read. I highly recommend it.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★
stephanie todd
Loved loved loved this book. So interesting to read from a surgeon's perspective. Wish he would write more books. Anything to do with the human brain is just amazing to me. I couldn't put this book down.
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